The Society of Surgical Oncology, inc.
The American Society of Breast Surgeons.
Annals of Surgical Oncology

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Poor Prognosis After Second Locoregional Recurrences in the CALOR Trial

Irene L. Wapnir MD, Shari Gelber MS, Stewart J. Anderson PhD, Eleftherios P. Mamounas MD, André Robidoux MD, Miguel Martín MD, Johan W. R. Nortier MD, Charles E. Geyer Jr MD, Alexander H. G. Paterson MD, István Láng MD, Karen N. Price BS, Alan S. Coates MD, Richard D. Gelber PhD, Priya Rastogi MD, Meredith M. Regan ScD, Norman Wolmark MD, Stefan Aebi MD
Breast Oncology
Volume 24, Issue 2 / February , 2017

Abstract

Background

Isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRRs) of breast cancer confer a significant risk for the development of distant metastasis. Management practices and second ILRR events in the Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer (CALOR) trial were investigated.

Methods

In this study, 162 patients with ILRR were randomly assigned to receive postoperative chemotherapy or no chemotherapy. Descriptive statistics characterize outcomes according to local therapy and the influence of hormone receptor status on subsequent recurrences. Competing risk regression models, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate associations between treatment, site of second recurrence, and outcome.

Results

The median follow-up period was 4.9 years. Of the 98 patients who received breast-conserving primary surgery 89 had an ipsilateral-breast tumor recurrence. Salvage mastectomy was performed for 73 patients and repeat lumpectomy for 16 patients. Another eight patients had nodal ILRR, and one patient had chest wall ILRR. Among 64 patients whose primary surgery was mastectomy, 52 had chest wall/skin ILRR, and 12 had nodal ILRR. For 15 patients, a second ILRR developed a median of 1.6 years (range 0.08–4.8 years) after ILRR. All second ILRRs occurred for patients with progesterone receptor-negative ILRR. Death occurred for 7 (47 %) of 15 patients with a second ILRR and 19 (51 %) of 37 patients with a distant recurrence. As shown in the multivariable analysis, the significant predictors of survival after either a second ILRR or distant recurrence were chemotherapy for the primary cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.55; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.15–10.9; p = 0.03) and the interval (continuous) from the primary surgery (HR, 0.87; 95 % CI, 0.75–1.00; p = 0.05).

Conclusions

Second ILRRs represented about one third of all recurrence events after ILRR, and all were PR-negative. These second ILRRs and distant metastases portend an unfavorable outcome.

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